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Safety / Security / Stability / Resilience [clear filter]
Tuesday, November 26
 

11:30

WS 218 Deliberating Governance Approaches to Disinformation
Session Organizers
avatar for Megan Metzger

Megan Metzger

Research Scholar and Associate Director for Research, Stanford University, Global Digital Policy Incubator
I work on human rights and AI, creative approaches to managing the challenges of online content, and multistakeholder approaches to solving the problems of the digital age. I have also conducted research on social media and protest in Ukraine and Turkey, and on the Russian state’s... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 11:30 - 13:00
Saal Europa Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

11:30

WS 41 Tech Nationalism: 5G, Cybersecurity and Trade
This session will discuss the competition over 5G and other “strategic” informaton and communication technologies that are alleged to be critical to national power. The workshop is structured as a debate, as there are two distinct sides to tech nationalism (basically pro and con), but the speakers are not polarized and will be able to appreciate the claims of either position. The debate will explore how the securitization of software and equipment affects Internet governance and the digital economy. The panel will include perspectives from the USA, Europe, India, and China. 

The panel will be co-moderated by: 

  • Milton Mueller, Director of the Internet Governance Project at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA
  • William Drake, International Fellow and Lecturer at the University of Zurich
Panelists include:
  • Jyoti Panday , Researcher, India Telecom Center of Excellence, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
  • Jan-Peter Kleinhans, Project Director IT Security in the Internet of Things, Stiftung Neue Verantwortung
  • Tobias Feakin, Ambassador for Cyber Affairs of the Australian Government 
  • Donald Morrissey, Head of U.S. Congressional, State, and Local Government Affairs for Huawei Technologies LLC (USA)
The moderators will pose questions and issues to pairs of speakers with contrasting views. They will engage with each other, debating the differences and trying to reach agreement. There will be three rounds of this. Then there will be an opening to the audience to discuss one side or the other. In the final segment the discussion will be steered toward resolution and agreement on best practices.

Schedule:

11:30-11:40    Overview of topic, introduction of panelists and process 

11:40-12:00    Topic 1: The Nature of Techno-nationalism  

  • What is techno-nationalism and how widespread is it in the industrialized and developing worlds? 
  • For example, many observers have detected a subcategory called "data nationalism" that views data as a 'national resource' to be 'protected' by the state. What are the arguments for and against this approach? 

12:00-12:20    Topic 2: The Battle Over 5G 

  • What cybersecurity threats, if any, are posed by the national origin of 5G infrastructure suppliers? 
  • How much of the concern about foreign equipment, software and data use is motivated more by economic than by cybersecurity concerns (e.g. in the US, China, Australia, Europe…)
  • Is it possible to reconcile techno-nationalist approaches to 5G with global markets for software, services and equipment? 

12:20-12:30    Topic 3: What is to be Done?  

  • How could we advance the search for more cooperative solutions to techno-nationalist policies?
  • Is techno-nationalism compatible with global multistakeholder governance of the Internet?

12:30-13:00    Open Discussion Among All Participants  


Session Organizers
avatar for Milton Mueller

Milton Mueller

Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
Milton Mueller is the O.G. of I.G. He directs the Internet Governance Project, a center for research and engagement on global Internet governance. Mueller's books Will the Internet Fragment? (Polity, 2017), Networks and States: The global politics of Internet governance (MIT Press... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 11:30 - 13:00
Raum V Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany
 
Wednesday, November 27
 

09:30

WS 195 Cybersecurity concerns everyone - Responsibility and education throughout the digital supply chain
Cybersecurity concerns everyone. To ensure a product’s security it is key that everyone along the value chain – from development through production and delivery and beyond – is aware and educated about the risks and responsibilities. But how do we manage this task?
The Charter of Trust invites you to discuss this questions during our workshop at the Internet Governance Forum. Founded at the Munich Security Conference in 2018, the Charter of Trust is a cybersecurity alliance of 16 global leaders like Siemens, Cisco, IBM or Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. During our workshop you will hear talks by Eva Schulz-Kamm, Head of Global Government Affairs at Siemens AG and Laurent Bernat, Policy Analyst for Digital Security Policy at the OECD. They will later be joined by Dr. Alexander Wolf, CEO Division Business Assurance at TÜV SÜD AG, Jacques Kruse-Brandao, Global Head of Advocacy at SGS, Wolfgang Percy Ott, Head of Government Affairs Germany at Cisco, and Dr. Jochen Friedrich, Technical Relations Executive at IBM. They all will discuss the challenges of responsibility and education throughout the entire value chain and how the Charter of Trust has worked to tackle these challenges.
 
For more on the Charter of Trust and its members visit charter-of-trust.com

Session Organizers
FH

Felix Hofmann

Account Manager, GPLUS



Wednesday November 27, 2019 09:30 - 11:00
Raum V Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

09:30

11:30

11:30

WS 341 Roadmap for Confidence Building Measures (CBM) in Cyberspace

This session will take an expansive look at confidence building measures (CBMs) in cyberspace. An accelerating arms race between nations in the “fifth domain of conflict” – cyberspace – is likely to continue unabated without the imposition of meaningful processes and dialogues meant to reduce tensions and promote trust among competing and even allied countries. Such activities can mirror traditional approaches to confidence building in other conflict domains, including diplomatic engagements, information sharing, and technology exchanges, but might also involve innovative new approaches unique to cyberspace – including focusing on cooperative cybersecurity capacity building. Panelistsl will  represent government perspectives, as well as those of intergovernmental organizations and the technology industry.

The session format will allow speakers to present their respective points of view as it relates to the potential of CBMs in cyberspace, as well as the opportunity to challenge and respond to one another on which approaches might be most effective. Importantly, the session will help educate those attending the session on this emerging area of cyber diplomacy and leave ample time for questions and comments directly from those in attendance, in person and online. 

More information on the session and list of speakers


Session Organizers
avatar for John

John

Program Manager, Microsoft


Wednesday November 27, 2019 11:30 - 13:00
Raum V Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

15:00

WS 59 Digital Sovereignty and Internet Fragmentation
The tension between national sovereignty and the global Internet is probably the single most fundamental Internet governance issue today.

The Internet protocols create a globally connected virtual space; in the technical structure of cyberspace distance and territory do not matter. Governmental authority, on the other hand, is bounded by geographic territory and each government is supposed to have supreme authority in its territory. Ever since the World Summit on the Information Society, governments have been trying to insert the concept of sovereignty into Internet governance discussions. On the other hand, many Internet users, platforms and service providers have been promoting the benefits of seamless global interconnection. There is a clash between the two distinct models of Internet governance. 

The purpose of this workshop is to explore the new discourse and practice of national sovereignty over cyberspace and to consider its implications for Internet openness vs. fragmentation. But in cybersecurity traditional security and stability practices have had to be modified, often relying on multistakeholder cooperation and cross-border operations in which the power of states is shared with many other actors. Today, in a context of cyber-attacks by state actors and a globalized digital economy, efforts to assert territorial control into cyberspace and project it onto all things digital are gathering momentum. 

The session is an interactive roundtable. It includes a diverse and expert set of prominent personalities:

  • Lise Fuhr, European Telecommunications Network Operators Association.
  • Vinton Cerf, Google
  • Ilona Stadnik, St. Petersburg University, Russia.
  • Alexander Isavnin, Internet Protection Society of Russia
  • Ambassador Achilles Zaluar, Foreign Ministry of Brazil
  • Xu Peixi, Communications University of China
  • Mona Badran, Cairo University Egypt

Moderators:
  • Dr. Milton Mueller, Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology and Director, Internet Governance Project 
  • Dr. William J Drake, International Fellow and Lecturer in the Media Change & Innovation Division of the Department of Communication and Media Research at the University of Zurich

Policy questions to be addressed:

1. The nature of national sovereignty and its extension to 'digital sovereignty' or ‘cyberspace sovereignty’
  • Is digital sovereignty compatible with the globalized access provided by the Internet protocols?
  • What is gained and what is lost by trying to make cyberspace conform to principles of territorial sovereignty?
  • How does sovereignty in cyberspace relate to/differ from traditional notions of sovereignty that shaped international communications policy since the 1850s?

2. National effects of digital sovereignty:
  • How do attempts by some countries to create a "sovereign Internet" affect the human rights of Internet users?
  • How do national boundaries on data flows affect economic development, competition and efficiency in the global digital economy?
  • How does sovereignty in cyberspace affect the security and privacy of Internet users?

3. Global effects of digital sovereignty:
  • Is digital sovereignty compatible with a global internet or will it lead to fragmentation of the infrastructure or the services and processes that it supports? 
  • How do national boundaries impact foreign firms seeking to operate locally? Are they consistent with international trade and other multilateral obligations?
  • Why and how are countries trying to create "national Internets?" 
4. Governance responses: 
  • Would it be better to conceive of cyberspace as a global commons similar to the high seas or outer space? What are the policy and governance implications? 
  • What blend of institutional settings would be useful in addressing the conflicts engendered by by strongly statist digital sovereignty practices? What would be the role of e.g. security arrangements, international trade agreements, international privacy agreements, MLATs and other efforts to deal with access issues of concern to law enforcement and others?
  • Is there any role in this discussion for multistakeholder cooperation, or is sovereignty a matter on which only states should engage? If there is a role, how could this be structured?

Session Organizers
avatar for Milton Mueller

Milton Mueller

Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
Milton Mueller is the O.G. of I.G. He directs the Internet Governance Project, a center for research and engagement on global Internet governance. Mueller's books Will the Internet Fragment? (Polity, 2017), Networks and States: The global politics of Internet governance (MIT Press... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 15:00 - 16:30
Saal Europa Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

15:00

16:40

WS 331 Should We Tackle Illicit Content Through the DNS?
Theme: 

Security, Safety, Stability and Resilience

Subtheme(s): 

Domain Name System
Human Rights
Illicit content

Organizer 1: Hartmut Glaser, Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (CGI.br)
Organizer 2: Thiago Tavares, Safernet Brazil 
Organizer 3: Rocío de la Fuente, LACTLD
Organizer 4: Nathalia Patrício, NIC.br

Speaker 1: Bertrand de La Chapelle, Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
Speaker 2: Polina Malaja, Technical Community, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
Speaker 3: Manal Ismail, Government, African Group
Speaker 4: Jennifer Chung, Technical Community, Asia-Pacific Group
Speaker 5: Thomas Rickert, Private Sector, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Additional Speakers

LAC Region Stakeholder: Miguel Ignacio Estrada, Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Regional Group (GRULAC)

Policy Question(s)

Two policy questions will guide discussions throughout the session. The first one deals with the different layers that, combined, enable the Internet to work. The second one delves into the issue of responsibility. - Policy question #1: Is “blocking access to illegal online content in the level of DNS infrastructure” as effective as “removing illegal content by taking action against the owner/publisher or the hosting providers”? - Policy question #2: Should DNS operators play any role in general efforts aimed at tackling illegal content on the Internet? If DNS operators have any role to play, should they bear the same responsibilities as hosting providers and publishers of illegal content or should they have a different legal treatment? What are the risks inherent to a one-size-fits-all approach to the matter? In the end, both questions require a risk assessment to allow for an evaluation of the direct and indirect implications of each possible response.

Format

Other - 90 Min
Format description: Town Hall model will be applied - auditorium or classroom

Description: Methodology & flow of session: The session will apply an adapted version of the “Town Hall model” to enable both a controlled as well as a free style of multistakeholder dialogue and aim at providing an overarching conversation by a very plural group of participants on all of the aspects inherent to the topic under discussion. A local stakeholder has been invited to bridge global discussions to the current landscape of Germany. It will be structured around a brief presentation of (a) the relevance of the topic, (b) its relation to Internet governance and the SDGs and (c) the policy questions selected for discussion by the onsite moderator (5min). Two brief interventions (10 minutes each) will kick start discussions: one will present a “global status” of the Internet and jurisdiction debate, with a special focus on activities that explored the DNS as an avenue to tackle illicit content and endangered the security, stability and resiliency of the Internet; the other one will present the European experience vis-à-vis the role of DNS operators in fighting illicit content online. After that, the moderator will entertain open-ended discussions about the first and the second policy questions in sequence (30 minutes each). In each 30-minutes segment, the moderator will give the floor in a random fashion (seeking to keep a multi-stakeholder balanced) to people on site and people following the session remotely. The audience will be able to engage with comments and questions (2 minutes each) directed to the invited speakers/participants, who cover a wide array of stakeholder groups as described in the “co-organizers” and “speakers” sections below (ccTLD and gTLD operators, technical community organisations, companies, government officials). Comments and questions might also be directed to other people in the audience. The last five minutes of the session will be used by the moderator to summarise discussions and point out further avenues for future dialogue. Synoptic session agenda: - Introductory remarks by the moderator - 5 minutes - Short introduction on the “global status” of the Internet and jurisdiction debate - 10 minutes - Short introduction on the European experience - 10 minutes - Open-ended Q&A session among participants (two segments) -- Policy question #1: Is “blocking access to illegal online content in the level of infrastructure” as effective as “removing illegal content by taking action against the owner/publisher or the hosting providers”? -- Policy question #2: Should DNS operators play any role in general efforts aimed at tackling illegal content from the Internet? If they have any role to play, should DNS operators bear the same responsibilities as hosting providers and publishers of illegal content or should they have a different legal treatment? What are the risks inherent to a one-size-fits-all approach to the matter? - Concluding remarks by the moderator - 5 minutes

Expected Outcomes: - Outreach with multiple and distinct stakeholders in order to spread the word and include more people on the debate. - Build new networks for discussion and collaboration on the topic. - Detailed report: map of good and bad examples of local legal frameworks applicable to the DNS as well as of policies and initiatives adopted by DNS operators to deal with illegal online content. - Potential impact on policy making through the diffusion of the workshop results.

Onsite Moderator

Thiago Tavares, Civil Society, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)

Online Moderator

Nathalia Patrício, Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)

Rapporteur:

Vinicius W. O. Santos, Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)

Discussion Facilitation

The discussion will be facilitated by the onsite moderator who will guide the debate in each of the proposed segments for the workshop. The online moderator will make sure the remote participants are represented in the debate. Online participation and interaction will rely on the WebEx platform. Those joining the session using WebEx (either invited members of the Town Hall or the general audience) will be granted the floor in the segments of the workshop. The person in charge of the moderation will strive to entertain onsite and remote participation indiscriminately. Social media (twitter and facebook) will also be employed by the online moderator who will be in charge of browsing social media using some hashtags (to be defined).

Online Participation: 

Online participation and interaction will rely on the WebEx platform. Those joining the session using WebEx (either invited members of the Town Hall or the general audience) will be granted the floor in the segments of the workshop. People in charge of the moderation will strive to entertain onsite and remote participation indiscriminately.

Proposed Additional Tools: Social media (twitter and facebook) will also be employed by the online moderator who will be in charge of browsing social media using some hashtags (to be defined).

SDGs: 

GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

Reference Document

Agenda: 

*Session agenda*

- Introductory remarks by the moderator - *5 minutes*
- Short introduction on the “global status” of the Internet and jurisdiction debate - *10 minutes*
- Short introduction on the European experience - *10 minutes*

- Open-ended Q&A session among participants (*two segments*)

*Policy question #1*: Is “blocking access to illegal online content in the level of infrastructure” as effective as “removing illegal content by taking action against the owner/publisher or the hosting providers”? *30 min*

*Policy question #2*: Should DNS operators play any role in general efforts aimed at tackling illegal content from the Internet? If they have any role to play, should DNS operators bear the same responsibilities as hosting providers and publishers of illegal content or should they have a different legal treatment? What are the risks inherent to a one-size-fits-all approach to the matter? *30 min*

- Concluding remarks by the moderator - *5 minutes*

...

Session Organizers
avatar for Nathalia Sautchuk Patricio

Nathalia Sautchuk Patricio

Technical Advisor, NIC.br
I'm a computer engineer. I am a Technical Advisor to CGI.br and professor in some universities. My interests are: network neutrality, Education and ICT, Social and Digital Inclusion.
avatar for Vinicius W. O. Santos

Vinicius W. O. Santos

Expert advisor, NIC.br / CGI.br
Expert advisor to the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (CGI.br)


Wednesday November 27, 2019 16:40 - 18:10
Raum V Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

17:00

 
Thursday, November 28
 

09:30

WS 359 Network Disruptions across Borders: A New Cyber Response
Governments intentionally disrupt access to the internet, including fixed and mobile networks, in response to governance challenges ranging from public protests to cheating on school exams. Recently, these disruptions have spanned entire countries, and also reached across borders in the form of attacks that aim to prevent and mitigate cross-border cybersecurity threats. Speakers will describe the range of interference with connectivity and access currently taking place, illuminate the various impacts on human, economic, and social rights as well as development, and seek to build and strengthen norms on internet access pursuant to the Sustainable Development Goals, and domestic and international law. 

Speakers include:
  • Amir Rashidi, Internet Security & Digital Rights Researcher, Center for Human Rights in Iran
  • Koliwe Majama, Zimbabwean Journalist, African School on Intenet Governance (AfriSIG) Organizer, Media Rights Activist
  • Melody Patry, Advocacy Director, Access Now
  • Ross Creelman, Public Policy Officer, European Telecommunications Network Operators (ETNO)
  • Kelly Kim, General Counsel, OpenNet Korea (Moderator)



Session Organizers
avatar for Peter Micek

Peter Micek

General Counsel, Access Now


Thursday November 28, 2019 09:30 - 10:30
Saal Europa Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

09:30

10:35

WS 63 Usual Suspects: Questioning the Cybernorm-making Boundaries
Workshop Description, here.

Developing and implementing cybernorms is very much an Internet governance problem. This may be the year where the IGF community will rally around this notion.
This workshop will facilitate a dialogue between the policy and technical communities on the operationalisation of cybernorms. In particular, we will explore the technical angle of implementing three widely agreed norms: GCSC Norm 1 about protecting the public core; GCSC Norm 2 about protecting electoral systems; and UNGGE Norm 7 about answering requests for assistance.

Governance is about principles and values, wants and needs. But any governance decision eventually ends up at implementation. Sound decision-making about implementation relies on access to quality information – particularly, in this case, quality technical knowledge about the kinds of opportunities and challenges that will arise from the operationalisation of cybernorms.

Cybernorms are political – there is no question of that. And as a political instrument, geopolitics plays out through red lines, negotiations, alliances etc. Many in the technical community may find cybernorms a futile and irrelevant discourse, but we believe this can change through a constructive dialogue between the policy and technical communities.

---

  • Madeline Carr -- Professor of Global Politics and Cybersecurity at UCL
  • Pablo Hinojosa -- Strategic Engagement Director, APNIC
  • Louise Marie Hurel -- Cybersecurity Governance Researcher, LSE
  • Merike Kaeo -- Strategic Security Leadership & ICANN Board Member
  • Maarten Van Horenbeeck -- Board Member, First.org / Chief Information Security Officer at Zendesk
  • Cristine Hoepers -- General Manager, CERT .br
  • Koichiro Komiyama -- Deputy Director, JPCERT/CC
  • Sumon Ahmed Sabir -- CTO at Fiber@Home
  • Sheetal Kumar -- Programe Lead, Global Partners Digital
  • Liam Neville -- Assistant Director, Cyber Policy at Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade



Session Organizers
avatar for Pablo Hinojosa

Pablo Hinojosa

Strategic Engagement Director, APNIC


Thursday November 28, 2019 10:35 - 11:35
Saal Europa Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

11:30

11:45

15:00

15:00

16:40

16:40

WS 23 How and Why to Involve Perspectives of Children Effectively
Organizers:
  • William Bird, Media Monitoring Africa 
  • Daniela Tews, Deutsches Kinderhilfswerk e.V.

Policy Questions:
What are the views and positions of different stakeholders on children's rights to privacy and data protection? Who is responsible for the protection of data of children and how to fill the gaps of implementation? How to responsibly balance between protection and participation rights of children?

 

Description:
 Protecting children and young people from the risks and harm that the Internet and digital media can cause is indisputably important. However, to allow them to participate/engage in an age-appropriate and child-friendly way in developments and decisions that open up safe, creative and protected possibilities of using the Internet, is an approach that is still under-represented. Governments, public authorities and businesses make decisions about conditions, rules and opportunities for using the Internet and digital media and content that must also take into account the best interests of children and young people. Today, children are not only subjects to be protected from risks and harmful contents or experiences. They are not only consumers of media and devices. They are producers, readers, gamers and influencers, they have expertise, impact and power which can help understanding their views and changing policies in a human rights based and child-friendly way. Perspectives of children and youth are of course as different as the regions and cultures as well as the living conditions and chances of human beings. But children have the right to be heard in every issue they are affected of. That’s what the UN-Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) stands for and what has to be realised from the duty-bearers of the Convention – the States parties, the companies and all adult persons. The respect for and implementation of Children's Rights has an essential dimension particular in digital contexts. At the same time, digitization offers a high potential for realizing to a greater extent the previously unrealized or under-implemented rights of children. The right to access to mass media (Art. 17 CRC) , the right to privacy (Art. 16 CRC), the right to freedom of expression (Art. 13 CRC), the right to be protected from violence (Art. 19 CRC)– these are only a few dimensions, which open the view for discussions on this issue.


Agenda:
  1. Presentations good/ best practice
  2. Presentation human centered design
  3. Interactive tool sessions in small groups and result presentations
  4. Reflections and discussion about the learnings

Speaker:
 
  • Felix Noller, Chapter Berlin, D4CR, Technical Community, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
  • Phakamile Khumalo, Coordinator „Web Rangers Project”, Media Monitoring Africa, Civil Society, African Group
  • Joy Fakude, Participant „Web Rangers Project”, Media Monitoring Africa, Civil Society, African Group
  • Resegofaditswe Matlapeng, Participant „Web Rangers Project”, Media Monitoring Africa, Civil Society, African Group
  • Daniela Beyerle, Managing Partner, minds & makers, Private Sector, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Session Organizers
avatar for Frederik Jagielski

Frederik Jagielski

Student Assistant, Coordination Office for Children's Rights, Deutsches Kinderhilfswerk e.V. (German Children´s Fund)
Student - Social Sciences M.A., HU
avatar for Daniela Tews

Daniela Tews

Media Policy Advisor - Coordination Office for Children's Rights, Deutsches Kinderhilfswerk e.V.
Children's Rights in digital environment


Thursday November 28, 2019 16:40 - 18:10
Saal Europa Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany
 
Friday, November 29
 

09:30

WS 247 Internet De-tox: A Fail-proof Regimen to End Online Sexism

An effective online content governance framework that balances freedom of expression and freedom from misogynistic speech continues to be a policy challenge for gender inclusion. The attacks that women face in the online public sphere reflects social prejudice that is deeply based on context, and intersectional. For instance, in India and Brazil, caste and race are ever-present in the hate that women encounter online.

In this panel, we will upresent for the first time first the preliminary results of a research being developed in parnership by InternetLab (Brazil) and IT for Change (India), in which legal frameworks and court rulings in both countries are being analyzed; the results so far provide insights into the normalization of misogynous speech and issues around access to justice. Expert panelists from the African and European regions will also provide insights into the following policy questions: 

1. Local-level legislation and policies: What is the character of the current legal vacuum, and which are possible solutions for enhancing women's protection against hate speech online, at the local level?

2. Solutions at the platform level / policies directed to platforms: what have been the outcomes of national or regional initiatives directed to platforms to curb hate speech, such as the NetzDG or the EU Code of Conduct? How to evaluate those policies in comparison with private regulation developed by platforms themselves, or new developments such as Facebook's External Oversight Board?

3. Algorithmic filtering: Is preemptive filtering an effective tool to tackle gender-based hate speech online? Or is overcensorship an inevitable outcome? What does experience suggest?



Speakers:

Speaker 1: Mariana Valente, InternetLab (Brazil)
Speaker 2: Neema Iyer, Pollicy (Uganda)
Speaker 3: Bhavna Jha, IT for Change (India)
Speaker 4: Christophe Speckbacher, Programme Manager, Gender Equality Division, DG II – Democracy, Council of Europe



Session Organizers
avatar for Mariana Valente

Mariana Valente

Director, InternetLab
Director of InternetLab, where I do research around human rights and the Internet; Internet regulation; Gender and Tech; Access to knowledge and Copyright.


Friday November 29, 2019 09:30 - 11:00
Raum V Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

09:30