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Data Governance [clear filter]
Tuesday, November 26
 

09:30

09:30

Data Governance Introductory Session

The aim of this interactive Introductory Session is to set the scene for the various sessions taking place during the week under the theme of Data Governance, the description of which can be found below.

To kick off the session and provide her insights on this broad topic, we are very fortunate to have Marie-Laure Denis, President of CNIL, the French data protection authority.  

The session will then proceed with small, informal group discussions on six different aspects of Data Governance: Cross-border data;  Jurisdictional & sovereignty issues; Data protection frameworks; Data & sustainable development; Human rights & internet ethics; and Governance & ethics of AI algorithms. The six sub-themes are represented in this graphic -  https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/filedepot_download/8432/1674. Participants will be encouraged to share their views and experience regarding key policy issues in these six break-out sessions, discuss pressing policy questions.

The session will close with reports back from each breakout group to the full room. We hope that this session helps people to learn more about sessions in areas of particular personal interest that will be taking place in Berlin, as well as connecting with others interested in, and working on, the same policy issues.

AGENDA

09:30 – 09:35 Welcome and Introductions

09:35 – 10:00 Scene-setting remarks by, and questions to, Marie-Laure Denis, President, CNIL (French Data Protection Authority)

10:00 – 10:40 Sub-thematic breakout sessions

10:40 – 11:15 Reports back from breakout sessions

11:15 – 11:20 Conclusion

BACKGROUND

The Data Governance track will provide for discussions on the fundamental challenge of ensuring the benefits of the data revolution to contribute to inclusive economic development while protecting the rights of people. 

The global nature of the Internet and the transfer of digital information across borders brings an international dimension to discussions around data. The generation, collection, storage, transfer and processing of data (including personally identifiable data) have enabled new social, cultural, and economic opportunities than ever previously imagined. At the same time, the massive collection, transfer  and processing of data (in particular through the application of algorithms/AI/machine learning) by public as well as private entities pose challenges around privacy, freedom of expression and the exercise of other human rights.

The Data Governance track will contribute to identifying best approaches to ensure the development of human-centric data governance frameworks at national, regional and international levels. It will enable an exchange of views on how to support and operationalize the exercise of human rights and the empowerment of individuals in their digital identity in current uses and development of data-driven technologies. And it will consider how to create the conditions needed to facilitate data-driven innovation, to ensure competition, and to foster trust in the development of services and new technologies, including through the use of inclusive data and the fulfillment of the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.


Session Organizers
avatar for Ben Wallis

Ben Wallis

Regulatory Policy Analyst, Microsoft



Tuesday November 26, 2019 09:30 - 11:20
Raum I Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

10:00

NRIs Collaborative Session on Human Rights
NRIs Collaborative Sessions are interactive sessions organised by a number of national and regional IGFs (NRIs) from different regions on a topic of mutual interest. All topics are defined based on the open, consultative, bottom-up process across all NRIs.

This topic is organized by the following NRIs:
Haiti IGF
Lebanon IGF
Malawi IGF
France IGF
Italian IGF
South Sudan IGF
Togo IGF YES


Policy Questions to be discussed:
  1. What are the priorities regarding the human rights for local communities?
  2. How do we protect the privacy and free speech on the Internet?
  3. Should national approaches to regulation be internationally harmonized and how?
  4. Are there concrete examples of digital cooperation on national and regional levels for protecting human rights on the Internet?

Tuesday November 26, 2019 10:00 - 11:00
Saal Europa Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

11:30

WS 184 Crossborder Data: Connecting SMEs in the Global Supply Chain
In an increasingly interconnected world, small and medium sizedenterprises (SMEs) have the most to gain from the cross-border data flows that support global trade, but at the same time, are themost vulnerable to the challenges they pose.

Organzied by ICC BASIS, the International Trade Center and the African Union, this workshop will uncover how cross-borderdata flows impact SMEs, what data-enabled technologies do SME suse in their day-to-day activities, as well as discuss fundamental data protection and privacy considerations.

MODERATOR
  • Thomas Grob, Deutsche Telekom

PANELISTS
  • Siva Devireddy, GoCoop
  • James Howe, International Trade Center
  • Małgorzata Ignatowicz, Office of Electronic Communications of Poland
  • Carsten Kestermann, Amazon Web Services
  • Sheetal Kumar, Global Partners Digital
  • Cornelia Kutterer, Microsoft

Session Organizers
avatar for Timea Suto

Timea Suto

Knowledge Manager, ICC BASIS
Timea coordinates activities and input for ICC’s Business Action to Support the Information Society (BASIS). In this role she helps bring together experts that make up the global membership of the advocacy initiative. BASIS acts as the voice of business and facilitates business... Read More →


Tuesday November 26, 2019 11:30 - 13:00
Raum I Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

11:30

 
Wednesday, November 27
 

09:30

09:30

09:30

10:45

11:30

WS 170 Children's Privacy and Data Protection in Digital Contexts
Organizers:
  • William Bird, Media Monitoring Africa 
  • Daniela Tews, Deutsches Kinderhilfswerk e.V.

Policy Questions:
What are the views and positions of different stakeholders on children's rights to privacy and data protection? Who is responsible for the protection of data of children and how to fill the gaps of implementation? How to responsibly balance between protection and participation rights of children?

 

Description:
Personal rights such as the right to privacy and honour are not new. However, they become particularly relevant in the context of digital media use and digitisation. In view of the rapid and diverse distribution channels, personal data such as images or personal data in various forms like location or interests can quickly get out of control of one's own sphere of action and cause lasting damage. Especially when it comes to children and young people being online and becoming consumers of products and services, a particularly high responsibility to protect their privacy at various institutional levels is justified. These stakeholders must develop appropriate strategies that correspond and work together. Individuals, families, educational institutions and the state, and especially providers and developers of technologies, algorithms, games and online services, have to put personal rights before particular interests. These stakeholders are well aware of the many risks of media use and their responsibility towards children. However, their practice and actions often contradict this. There is a need for understanding and action here.


Agenda:
  1. Experts Input
  2. Break-Out Session
  3. Presentation Wall
  4. Reflection and Discussion

Speaker:
 
  • Steffen Eisentraut, Head of International Affairs, jugendschutz.net, Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
  • Sonia Livingstone OBE, Professor of Social Psychology, London School of Economics and Political Science, Technical Community, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
  • Phakamile Khumalo, Coordinator„Web Rangers Project”, Media Monitoring Africa, Civil Society, African Group
  • Gehad Madi, Member of the UN Comittee on the Rights of the Child, Intergovernmental Organization, African Group
  • Kai Hanke, Deputy Director, Deutsches Kinderhilfswerk e.V. (German Children´s Fund), Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
  • Rebekka Weiß, Head of Trust & Security, Bitkom e.V., Technical Community, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Session Organizers
avatar for Frederik Jagielski

Frederik Jagielski

Student Assistant, Coordination Office for Children's Rights, Deutsches Kinderhilfswerk e.V. (German Children´s Fund)
Student - Social Sciences M.A., HU
avatar for Daniela Tews

Daniela Tews

Media Policy Advisor - Coordination Office for Children's Rights, Deutsches Kinderhilfswerk e.V.
Children's Rights in digital environment


Wednesday November 27, 2019 11:30 - 13:00
Raum I Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

11:30

12:00

OF24 BBusiness and Human Rights in Technology Project: Applying the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights to digital technologies
Session Organizers
avatar for Mark Hodge

Mark Hodge

Senior Associate / Advisor, Shift / OHCHR B-Tech
avatar for Nathalie Stadelmann

Nathalie Stadelmann

Human Rights Officer, UN Human Rights Office
currently working on a project, the "B-Tech project" at UN Human Rights Office that will seek to help technology companies incorporate established international human rights principles into workable company practices.


Wednesday November 27, 2019 12:00 - 13:00
Convention Hall I - D Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

15:00

15:00

DC on Platform Responsibility
Platform Values: Conflicting Rights, AI and Tax Avoidance

This session will discuss three of the most crucial points of contention with regard to values underlying the operation of digital platforms: Conflicting Rights, Artificial Intelligence and Tax Avoidance.

The session will include presentations based on the papers featured in a special issue of the Computer Law & Security Review, celebrating five years of activities of the UN IGF Coalition on Platform Responsibility and devoted to 'Platform Value(s): Conflicting Rights, Artificial Intelligence and Tax Avoidance'.

The Special Issue, which is the 2019 official outcome of the coalition, will include also the finalised Best Practices on Platforms' Implementation on the Right to Effective Remedy, produced by the Coalition between May 2018 and March 2019 (available here).

Free hard copies of the Special Issue will be distributed. 
The Special Issue will also be released in open access starting 27 November 2019. In the meantime, you can read the editorial "Platform value(s): A multidimensional framework for online responsibility" here.

The session will have the following agenda:

·       Opening remarks by Nicolo Zingales, University of Leeds, and Luca Belli, FGV 

Part I- Platform Values, Freedom of Expression and Democracy

·       Keynote by Edison Lanza, Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression Organization of American States

·       Nic Suzor, Queensland University of Technology

·       Monica Rosina, Facebook 

Quick round of questions

Part II: Platform values and content moderation

·       Chris Marsden, University of Sussex

·       Ivar Hartmann, FGV 

·       Giovanni De Gregorio, Univerista' Milano Bicocca

·       Dragana Obradovic, Balkan Investigative Reporting Network 

Quick round of questions

Part III: Conflcting rights and values

·       Catherine Carnovale, Elsevier

·       Rolf H. Weber, University of Zurich

·       Catalina Goanta, Maastricht University

·       Yseult Marique, University of Essex

· Open Debate


Session Organizers
avatar for Nicolo Zingales

Nicolo Zingales

University of Leeds Law School
- Coordinator of the Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility- Associate Professor in competition and information law at the University of Leeds- Affiliate scholar at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society- Research associate of the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology... Read More →


Wednesday November 27, 2019 15:00 - 16:30
Estrel Saal B Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

15:00

15:00

16:10

OF37 Future Internet Governance Strategy for the European Union
The interactive panel session at the Internet Governance Forum 2019 will include experts from different stakeholder groups to discuss their perspectives on the future of internet governance and the role of Europe, and aims to encourage audiences to join the conversation.

Fostering digital transformation is higher than ever on the political agenda of the European Union and has been identified as a priority for unlocking future growth in Europe. Cutting-edge digital technologies such as artificial intelligence or distributed ledger technologies do not only promise economic advantages, they are also shaping the structure of our society.
This rapid diffusion of digital technologies asks for increased inclusive, multistakeholder and multidisciplinary collaborations to manage the internet, implementing new governance mechanisms that are fit for purpose for these new challenges.
Internet governance is now a top priority of several different public institutions and is becoming central to the geopolitical debate. The EU, as an important global actor, will play a fundamental role in setting standards and regulatory frameworks, as well as becoming a global trusted hub for ethical technology development.


The panel discussion will then unfold around few main questions:

  1. Does internet governance still appeal to all stakeholders, working together to foster on the internet the values that Europe holds dear: openness, inclusivity, transparency, privacy, cooperation, and the protection of data? 
  2. What concrete governance steps need to be taken for ensuring that innovation is driven by an ethical, sustainable and human-centric internet?
  3. What role will the EU play as a global actor of internet governance in the coming decade?

The session opens a window for discussing fundamental values that lead the way towards a new approach in internet governance. Moderated by Antoine Vergne (Missions Publiques), the Open Forum panel will consist of five experts with diverse backgrounds relevant for the future of internet governance.

Panelists:
  • Andrea Beccalli, Director Stakeholder Engagement at ICANN (The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers)- Technical community
  • Olivier Bringer, Head of Unit “Next-Generation Internet”, DG CNECT, European Commission-  International organisation
  • Maarit Palovirta, Director of Regulatory Affairs at ETNO (European Telecommunications Network Operators’ Association)-  Private sector
  • Dr. Julia Pohle, Senior Researcher at WZB Berlin Social Science Center- Academia
Organiser: European Commission

Session Organizers

Wednesday November 27, 2019 16:10 - 17:10
Convention Hall I - C Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

16:40

WS 211 Value and Regulation of Personal Data in the BRICS
Over the past decade BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) alone have added more than one billion users to the world’s Internet population and, over the next decade, a further one billion of BRICS nationals will be connected to the Internet. This incredible number of individuals are personal data producers, innovators and consumers and enjoy an ample range of rights, shaped by the various regulatory instruments that BRICS countries have recently adopted and are adopting with regard to data protection.

Importantly, as the majority of the world’s Internet population is going to be increasingly BRICS centered, the policies adopted by these countries are likely to have global impact. In such perspective, this workshop will address the following policy questions:

  1. What national laws (or other type of normative acts) regulate the collection and use of personal data in the BRICS country?
  2. Do the laws recently adopted by BRICS countries apply to foreign entities that do not have physical presence in such countries?
  3. Are data protection laws adopted by BRICS countries based on fundamental rights defined in Constitutional law or International binding documents?
  4. Are the newly adopted frameworks converging or diverging from other existing frameworks such as the European one? And are BRICS national frameworks they converging amongst themselves?

Speaker 1: Anja Kovacs, Civil Society, Asia-Pacific Group
Speaker 2: Dirk Delmartino, Private Sector, African Group
Speaker 3: Sagwadi Mabunda, Civil Society, African Group
Speaker 4: Andrey Shcherbovich, Civil Society, Eastern European Group
Speaker 5: Achilles Zaular, Government, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)
Speaker 6: Min Jiang, Civil Society, Asia-Pacific Group
Speaker 7: Sophie Kwasny, Intergovernmental Organization, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
Speaker 8: Luca Belli, Civil Society, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)

Session Organizers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Professor and Head of CyberBRICS.info, FGV Law School
Luca Belli, PhD is Professor of Internet Governance and Regulation at Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) Law School and associated researcher at the Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. He focuses on the regulation of Internet access, data protection (particularly regarding... Read More →
avatar for Yasmin Curzi de Mendonça

Yasmin Curzi de Mendonça

Researcher, FGV Law School
Researcher at the Center of Technology and Society from FGV Law School and PhD St. in Sociology at Rio de Janeiro State University. Researching about Content Moderation and Online Harassment.


Wednesday November 27, 2019 16:40 - 18:10
Raum I Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

16:40

WS 282 Data Governance by AI: Putting Human Rights at Risk?
Organized by the Internet Rights and Principles Dynamic Coalition (@netrights) and Amnesty International Germany (@AmnestyTech), this high-level roundtable considers the intensifying debate about how the roll-out of artificial intelligence capabilities - particularly those that can forgo the need for human intervention - needs to be more clearly aligned with international human rights law, and legal standards.

The principle that human rights exist online as they do offline (The Charter of Human Rights and Principles for the Internet; UN Human Rights Council, A/HRC/32/L.20, 2014; Council of Europe 2014) has gained a wide consensus across stakeholder groups. R&D and recent legislation around the world have flagged the rise in interest by regulators, public institutions, and service providers to develop and deploy AI systems across a range of services, public and business. These policies are becoming prioirties in internet and data governance policy agends at the local governmental, national and international level.

The session, invited speakers and those invited to present questions to the panelists, along with other interventions from the audience, will consider the relationship between AI and Human Rights in light of the question: What are the regulatory, technical, and ethical considerations for "Human Rights AI By Design"?

If you want to have your question considered as one posed to the panel, please send the question to info@irpcharter.org with the message heading "Question for WS282 IGF 2019"


Panellists
Renata Ávila, Executive Director, Ciudadanía Inteligente (Smart Citizens Foundation), Latin America @avilarenata
Markus Beeko, Secretary General, Amnesty International Germany @mnbeeko
Paul Nemitz, Principal Advisor at DG JUSTICE, European Commission @paulnemitz   
Jai Vipra, IT for Change, India (Youth), @ITforChange
Alex Walden, Free Expression and Human Rights @Google  

Remote Panellists
Bishakha Datta, Point of View, India @busydot
Katherine Getao, ICT Secretary, Kenyan Ministry of Information, Communications and Technology @ICTAuthorityKE 

Moderator: Marianne Franklin, IRPC/Goldsmiths University of London @GloComm
Remote Participaton Moderator: Sebastian Schweda, Amnesty International Germany @amnesty_de  
Rapporteur:  Minda Moreira, Internet Rights and Principles Coalition (IRPC) @mindabuzz

Session Organizers
avatar for Internet Rights and Principles Coalition/Amnesty International

Internet Rights and Principles Coalition/Amnesty International

The Internet Rights and Principles Dynamic Coalition (IRPC) is an open network of individuals and organizations committed to making the Internet work for human rights, based on the Charter of Human Rights and Principles for the Internet: Amnesty International is a global movement... Read More →



Wednesday November 27, 2019 16:40 - 18:10
Raum II Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany
 
Thursday, November 28
 

09:30

09:30

WS 271 Making Global Data Governance Work for Developing Countries
Data governance has been a key topic in the global agenda, but much of the debate has been driven by the interests of richer nations. This workshop will discuss data governance priorities for developing countries and how to make the future IGF Plus model for global digital cooperation work for low- and middle-income countries.

The workshop will also be an opportunity to discuss the findings of the paper Digital diplomacy: technology governance for developing countries, based on a consultation with developing country policymakers, businesses, academics and civil society to identify their key priorities for cross-border digital governance.

Participants
  • Kamal Bhattacharya, Pathways for Prosperity Commission
  • Mariana Valente, Director of InternetLab
  • Fabrizio Hochschild, UN’s Secretary-General Office
  • Elizabeth Stuart, Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford (moderator)
If you are participating remotely, please use #DigitalDiplomacy @p4pcommission so we can track your questions and comments.

Session Organizers
avatar for Beatriz Kira

Beatriz Kira

Senior Research and Policy Officer, Blavatnik School of Government


Thursday November 28, 2019 09:30 - 10:30
Raum I Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

09:30

WS 83 Different Parties' Role in PI Protection: AP's Practices

Full title: Different Parties' Roles in Personal Information Protection: Practices and Attempts in the View of the Asia-Pacific Region

Asia Pacific region is becoming the most active gathering place for technology innovation, it’s also the region that has the most prominent imbalance in data governance. However, in recent years, Asia Pacific countries has come to realize the importance of strengthening data governance, Australia, Singapore, Japan, Korea, India, China and so on have enacted laws & regulations or taken actions to build and amend their personal information protection systems. Over the past decade, experience in Internet governance has demonstrated the importance of multi-parties' participation. We hope the attempts and practices from government, civil society, technical community, private sector and individual will enrich the model of Internet governance. And we wish to work with different parties to form a joint force to promote personal information security and explore the value of the practice in a global perspective. 

We are honored create this panel for: 

  • Effectively publicize the measures and practices of personal information protection in the Asia Pacific Region.
  • Enhance participants' mutual understanding on the role that different subjects can play in personal information protection.
  • Enhance dialogue on personal information protection in different countries in the Asia Pacific region by initiating dialogue for sharing excellent practice and experience.


Panelists: 

  • Wolfgang Kleinwchter, Professor Emeritus for Internet Policy and Regulation at the University of Aarhus, Member of the ICANN Board
  • Jovan Kurbalija, Executive Director of DiploFoundation, Secretariat of the UN High-level Panel on Digital Cooperation
  • Duncan Macintosh, CEO of the APNIC Foundation
  • Henry Gao, Associate Professor of Law, Singapore Management University
  • Ajay Data, Founder and CEO of Data Xgen Technologies, who is now joining us remotely.
  • Hong Yanqing, Senior Researcher at Law and Development Academy at Peking University 

Session Organizers
avatar for WANG Yueqiao

WANG Yueqiao

Cybersecurity Association of China


Thursday November 28, 2019 09:30 - 10:30
Raum II Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

10:35

WS 179 Human-centered Design and Open Data: How to Improve AI
Machine Learning is leading a real data revolution. It is a sub-area of Artificial Intelligence (AI) that relies on data to identify pattern, classify, aggregate, in others words, to learn and generate values to societies. Data is the fuel for Machine Learning and the algorithms are becoming more powerful over the days. However, it is important to highlight the data is not equally available and distributed for everybody. Data may be a barrier of entry to ensure the global south can participate in this new economy. We argue that that data is being extracted from the global south and access is being monopolized by big players from the north, which is entrenching global south into a position of consumer, not producer of technology. In this workshop, we discuss how open data principles and web technologies could help to overcome some of the consequences of this data concentration and increase its quality. We also discuss how important is to bring a humanistic approach in Artificial Intelligence. We definitely need to involve people in the process of developing new cognitive technologies in order to find real requirements, decide what values should be incorporated in the system, evaluate its results and minimize its risks. In this case, we argue that different design approaches, such as Human-Centered and Interaction Design, is a powerful approach to be incorporate in machine learning projects once it helps to focus at the technological development based on people's needs. Last but not least, we also discuss the problematic of personal data and some technical and design initiatives that could help to re-decentralize the Web and give users control over their own data. Regarding all these issues, the importance of different design approaches, the use of open data principles and Web technologies are in the core of the debate. So, how do we contribute to inclusive economic development while attending people's need and protecting humans right? This emerging question will guide our workshop and it is the inspiration for all the policy questions detailed in the previous section. It will also give us theoretical and practical background to rethink aspects of data governance, data quality and AI development in order to be prepare us for immediate future.

Questions to stimulate a interdisciplinary debate about the importance of different design approaches, such as Human-Centered Design and Interaction Design, and open data principles to address two key challenges in data governance and AI:

  1. What are the developmental and ethical effects of data concentration? How can technical approaches address this challenge?
  2. To ensure the global south can participate in this new economy, to what extent and how can the open data agenda can contribute to ensuring equitable access to data? Is offering data under open data principles an effective strategy to achieve data quality?
  3. How can we ensure AI systems don't violate people's basic rights, and how can Open Data and different design approaches, such as Human-centered and Interaction Design help to prevent this?
  4. To what extent and how can different design approaches help evaluate and decide what values and priorities are programmed into the machines?
  5. How the inclusion in the design process can lead to AI that is better prepared to satisfy the needs of local people?
  6. Thus, how different design approaches may help to develop tools to give users the control over their own data, such as Web decentralization platforms?

Workshop agenda

  • Opening remarks on policies and practices regarding data governance and artificial intelligence by the moderator of the workshop (5 min)
  • Five interventions with use cases to generate the debate among the speakers and the audience about the importance of open data and different design approaches for data governance and Artificial Intelligence (20 minutes)
  • Experts and the audience will debate focusing on the development of a roadmap to address possible strategies for the data concentration and humanistic approach in AI (20min).
  • Closure by the moderator of the workshop (5 min)

Speakers

Diogo Cortiz da Silva, Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)
Heloisa Candello, Private Sector, IBM Research Lab - Brazil
Jaimie Boyd
, Government, Western European and Others Group (WEOG) - remote participation
Krzysztof Izdebski, Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
Luis Aranda
, Intergovernmental Organization, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Onsite Moderator 
Vagner Diniz
, Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC) 

Online Moderator

Mariko Kobayashi, Private Sector, Asia-Pacific Group 

Rapporteur
Nathalia Patrício, Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)


Session Organizers
avatar for Caroline Burle

Caroline Burle

Responsável por Relações Institucionais e Internacionais, Ceweb.br / Nic.br
Responsável pelas Relações Institucionais do Centro de Estudos sobre Tecnologias Web (Ceweb.br) e do W3C Brasil. É especialista em Negociação pela Fundação Getúlio Vargas e Mestre em Relações Internacionais pelo San Tiago Dantas. É integrante do Núcleo de Estudos e Análises... Read More →


Thursday November 28, 2019 10:35 - 11:35
Raum II Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

10:35

10:45

11:30

BPF IoT, Big Data, AI: Using IoT, Big Data, AI to address societal challenges
Best Practice Forum on IoT, Big Data and AI
The 2019 Best Practice Forum IoT, Big Data, AI focusses on policy challenges pertaining to the use of IoT, Big Data, AI to address societal challenges that otherwise would be more difficult to address. 
The BPF is part of the 2019 intersessional work program of the IGF and started its discussions already well ahead of the Berlin meeting. The BPF published a draft report that will be further completed with input from the BPF workshop at IGF2019.  (see below for more details on the report and how to provide feedback).


Draft Agenda
The BPF session will cover the same questions as the report:
  1. Introduction and background on the BPF process
  2. Opportunities:  IoT, Big Data, AI to address societal challenges
  3. Policy Challenges:
    1. Stimulating the use and uptake of IoT, Big Data, AI to address societal challenges
    2. Enhancing justified trust in IoT, Big Data, AI to stimulate their use to address societal challenges
    3. Challenges related to the collection, management, and use of data by IoT, Big Data, AI applications
  4. Concluding remarks
The BPF builds on the  BPF 2018 that focussed on fostering the multistakeholder dialogue in field of IoT, Big Data, AI in an Internet context.
 

Confirmed panelists:
Olivier Bringer, European Commission, Head of Unit -Next Generation Internet
Christine Tan, FIOT Open Lab, VP Business Development
David Salomão, INCM, Mozambique
Raymond Onuoha, Research ICT Africa / Regional Academic Network on IT Policy
Bruna Martins dos Santos, CodingRights, Policy Strategist
Emanuela Girardi, Pop AI, Member AI expert Group Ministry of Economic Development, Italy
Evelyne Tauchnitz, Research Associate at the Institute for Social Ethics, Lucerne & Centre for Technology and Global Affairs, Oxford


Moderators: 
Concettina Cassa (MAG BPF Co-coordinator),
Alex Comninos (BPF Co-coordinator),
Wim Degezelle (BPF Consultant) 

Online moderator:
June Parris

Rapporteur:
Marco Zennaro





REVIEW the draft output report !

IGF2019 BPF IoT, Big Data, AI draft output
Instructions:
  • Review the report here (link BPF report)
  • Send your feedback to  bpf-IoT-BD-AI@intgovforum.org
  • Format: email, or word/pdf attached to an email
  • If your comment is on a specific section or paragraph, please indicate this clearly! 
  • Deadline: you can submit feedback on the draft document until the last day of the IGF2019 meeting. However, we would appreciate receiving your feedback before Friday 22 November, as this would allow us to take your comments into account during the BPF workshop in Berlin.
  • Received feedback will be posed on this page (unless the author indicates that he/she prefers the feedback is not published) and will feed into the final BPF output report.  

Session Organizers
avatar for Wim Degezelle

Wim Degezelle

Consultant
Independent Internet policy Analyst and Consultant. - IGF Consultant Best Practice Forum on Cybersecurity - IGF Consultant Best Practice Forum on IoT, Big Data, AI
avatar for Concettina Cassa

Concettina Cassa

Funzionario, AGID
IGF MAG member. Co-facilitator of BPF on IoT, Big Data and AI. Italy IGF co-facilitator. Internet Governance Responsability in AgID (Agency for Digital Italy of Prime Minister Office - Rome). Member of Italy IGF 2019 Program Committee


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:30 - 13:00
Estrel Saal C Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

11:30

11:45

WS 175 Beyond Ethics Councils: How to Really do AI Governance
Session Organizers
avatar for Corinne Cath-Speth

Corinne Cath-Speth

PhD Candidate, Oxford Internet Institute & Alan Turing Institute
Internet governance, Internet standardization, tech-culture, AI, ethics, algorithms, human rights, civil society, social justice, feminism, diplomacy, IETF


Thursday November 28, 2019 11:45 - 13:10
Raum I Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

11:45

12:00

15:00

WS 178 Human-centric Digital Identities
Organizer: World Economic Forum, Geneva, Switzerland

In the world of growing digital interactions, what are individual-centric, scalable policies and practices on identity and data that create sustainable value to business, consumers and citizens?

Through a panel and a workshop with physical flipcharts we will:
  • Highlight good digital identity use cases such as seamless travel and health data exchange 
  • Broaden shared understanding of individual-centric principles on digital identity and data
  • Identify “lighthouse” activities and scalable, replicable best practices from around the world
  • Identify priority policy considerations that need multi-stakeholder dialogue and action

Panelists and Facilitators: 
  • Linda Bonyo, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, LawyersHub
  • Michael Bültmann, Managing Director, HERE Technologies
  • Sebastian Hufnagel, Government Affairs Manager EMEA, Dell
  • Dirk Woywod, Chief Technology Officer, Verimi 
  • Solana Larsen, Editor of the Internet Health Report, Mozilla
  • Solana Larsen, Editor of the Internet Health Report, Mozilla

Moderator: 

  • Mark Spelman, Head of Thought Leadership, World Economic Forum 

Online Moderator: 

  • Cristian Duda, Lead, Digital Identitty, World Economic Forum 

Rapporteur: 

  • Monika Glowacki, Research & Analysis Specialist, World Economic Forum 

Session Organizers
avatar for Cristian Duda

Cristian Duda

Lead, Digital Identity, World Economic Forum



Thursday November 28, 2019 15:00 - 16:30
Raum I Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

15:00

WS 182 Data Governance for Smarter City Mobility
The workshop focusses on the question of "How should data in Smart Cities be governed to foster the creation and delivery of effective, innovative and sustainable mobility and transportation services for citizens, while respecting their privacy and other fundamental rights?"

The goal of the workshop is to:
  • identify conflicts of interests in data (sharing) in the context of Smart City Mobility, based on the impulse statements as well as the own knowledge and experiences of the workshop participants. 
  • discuss possible data governance solutions  (e.g. principles for data governance), based on the impulse statements as well as the evidence from practice and the experiences and interests of the diverse stakeholders identified in the workshop itself.
  • develop concrete recommendations and best practices for urban planners, municipal administrations, civic initiatives, technology providers and other relevant actors

Workshop agenda:

The workshop will begin with a brief introduction of the workshop goal and format as well as the challenges and possible solutions of data Governance in connection to mobility in Smart Cities that we have identified in our working group’s current research. It will be followed by three to four impulse presentations on the core challenges of data governance in Smart Cities (see speakers list below).

The round table discussions will follow the Purpose to Practice - workshop format, where the stakeholders initially shape together all the elements that will determine the success of their initiative and hence a shared purpose. All additional elements—principles, participants, structure, and practices—are designed to help achieve the purpose.

Finally, each of the round table groups presents the results of their discussion, e.g. identified conflicts of interests in data (sharing) in the context of Smart City Mobility, possible data governance solutions as well as recommendations for the relevant actors in this field (esp. urban planners, municipal administrations, civic initiatives, technology providers).


Introduction 15 min
Introduction of the workshop goal and format, as well our working group’s research on data governance in connection to Smart City mobility
Impulse presentations on the core challenges of data governance in Smart Cities

Round tables 70 min:
4 Round table break-out discussions on:
  • Data protection and privacy
  • Political accountability and transparency
  • Human Rights and Inclusion
  • Innovation, Competition and Incentives
  • Technical Infrastructure and Interoperability


Closing Remarks 5 min:

We connect the outcomes of the round tables for a holistic outlook on data governance solutions in the context of Smart City mobility.  

Speakers:
  • Dörte Schramm, Private Sector, Organisation: Robert Bosch Gmbh
  • Dr. Martn Sauer, Private Sector, Organisation: Robert Bosch Gmbh
  • Eun Chang Choi, Academia, Organisation: The Free Internet Project
  • Dr. Kamalanetra A. C. Hung, Private Sector, Activist, Organisation: Pineapple Laboratories, IN_Visible

Organisors:
  • Max von Grafenstein, Einstein Center Digital Future
  • Alina Wernick, Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society



Session Organizers

Thursday November 28, 2019 15:00 - 16:30
Raum V Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

16:40

WS 412 AI Readiness for the SDGs
Theme: 

Data Governance

    
Organizer 1: Sarah Kiden, Univeristy of Dundee/Research ICT Africa (RAINTP)
Organizer 2: Grace Mutung'u, Kenya ICT Action Network (RAINTP)
Organizer 3: Alex Comninos, Research ICT Africa (RAINTP)

  Speaker 1: RAYMOND OKWUDIRI ONUOHA, Technical Community, African GroupSpeaker 2: Donggi Lee, Civil Society, Asia-Pacific GroupSpeaker 3: Gero Nagel, Private Sector, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
Speaker 4: Dr Greg Shannon,Chief Scientist for the CERT Division, Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University
 
Policy Question(s):
  • What does readiness to use AI to implement the SDGs look like? What would it require? What societal, political, economic and capacity structures would need to be in place to effectively work towards the SDGs?
  • What are the opportunities that could help catalyse AI usage for achieving the SDGs?
  • What are the bottlenecks or challenges as well as obstacles to using AI to achieve the SDGs?
  • How can we measure and quantify potential progress in using AI to achieve the SDGs?
  • How can we identify and quantify potential harms caused to the SDGs by AI?
  • What about the ecosystem of Big Data and IoT that AI exists within? How can big data and the internet of things create an enabling environment for the SDGs. How can we make sure that relevant and useful data is collected? How can IoT be used to expand access to ICTs as well as to collect useful data.

Relevance to Theme: Artificial Intelligence can provide opportunities for digital inclusion as well as amplify digital exclusion. AI, through its ability to assist with devision0making is likely to affect the SDGs both in positive and negative ways. AI can augment opportunities for the management of health, delivery of government services, education agriculture and business. Whether AI contributes to inclusion or exclusion will require a conscious effort to understand the ecosystem in which it exists, the social justice impacts of AI, and the capacity to beneficially implement AI.

Relevance to Internet Governance: Artificial Intelligence a group technologies that will require governance, as well as inform governance and decision-making from the local to international levels. There are many norms and principles for AI ethics proposed by Civil Society Groups and the Private Sector as well as AI Policies of Governments, but there are few governance frameworks for AI. The GDPR does provide some frameworks for the processing of personal information by AIs and the “right to explanation” but there are very few actual governance frameworks for AI.

How can AI be governed so as to help best attain the SDGs?

Format: 

Break-out Group Discussions - Round Tables - 60 Min

Part 1: Introduction to the topic: The "panelists" will be introduced, and each panelist will be responsible for facilitating discussion in their respective groups.

Part 2: Breakaway group discussion:
Each breakaway groups will be assigned a different country to come up with an AI Readiness Strategy for their particular country, accompanied by a set of policy recommendations.

We will the breakaway into groups with each group coming up with a readiness strategy to use AI to implement the SDGs.

Each group will discuss what the societal, political, economic, and capacity aspects of an AI Readiness strategy would require in their assigned country, and will also be asked to explore potential bottlenecks or challenges and obstacles to using AI to achieve the SDGs. At the same time, they will investigate how potential progress as well as harms may be quantified and mitigated. Each group will come up with an AI readiness strategy for their assigned country as well as a set of policy recommendations.

Panelists discussion and participation will be augmented by audience and remote participation, and making use of online editing and Twitter hashtags.

There will be one or two breakaway groups of internet participants, they will make use of collaborative editing pads for coming up with their strategies and policy recommendations. Twitter and the RP software will be used for the internet group to communicate with each other.

Part 3: Group report back:

Each group will report back on their AI Readiness strategy and policy recommendations

Part 4: Wrap up: Panelists will respond to the inputs from the groups.

 

Collaborative editing

Pad 1

Pad 2

Pad 3

Pad 4


Expected Outcomes: - The outputs of the breakaway groups will be implemented into the final session report. This aims to increase audience participation and contribution to the IGF.

The session aims more generally to:
- Developmenta roadmap towards using AI to implement the SDGs.
- Indentify challenges and opportunities to using AI to achieve the SDGs.
- Quantify harms and benefits of using AI to achieve the SDGs
- Broaden participation in the IGF through the use of different online platforms
- Identify best practices in using AI to achieve the SDGs

Onsite Moderator: 
Alex Comninos, Civil Society, African Group

Online Moderator/Rapporteur: Sarah Kiden, Civil Society, African Group

Discussion Facilitation: 

- Breakaway groups facilitate interaction fare better than panel discussions. We hope to add to interaction at the IGF through this format.

- Using the hashtag #AI4SDGs to facilitate discussion of the workshop on Twitter before and after the event.

- Through “crowdsourcing” a call for ideas towards using AI to implement the SDGs. We will do this with the collaborative editing pads (https://pads.riseup.net).

Online Participation: 

The remote participation can be a bit tricky with breakaway groups. We hope to network with remote hubs before the event, possibly there can be breakaway groups at the remote hubs.

There will be one or two breakaway groups of internet participants, they will make use of collaborative editing pads for coming up with their strategies and policy recommendations. Twitter and the RP software will be used for the internet group to communicate with each other.

Proposed Additional Tools: - Breakaway group format
- Twitter
- Collaborative editing (pads.riseup.net)
- Networking with remote hubs

SDGs: 

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 6: Clean Water and Sanitation
GOAL 7: Affordable and Clean Energy
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

Reference Document


Session Organizers
avatar for Sarah Kiden

Sarah Kiden

Marie Curie Research Fellow, University of Dundee and Mozilla
Technologist and researcher, working at the intersection of technology and communities.


Thursday November 28, 2019 16:40 - 17:40
Raum I Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

16:40

16:40

WS 381 Unpacking Digital Trade Impacts: Calling all Stakeholders
Session Organizers
avatar for Bruna Santos

Bruna Santos

Policy and Advocacy analyst, Coding Rights
I have a BA in Law and work as a Policy and Advocacy analyst at Coding Rights, with a special focus on Data Protection, Human Rights in the Digital Age and Internet Governance. Additionally, I also hold the position of Chair of the Non-Commercial Users Constituency (NCUC) at ICAN... Read More →
TS

Thomas Struett

American University


Thursday November 28, 2019 16:40 - 18:10
Estrel Saal C Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany
 
Friday, November 29
 

09:30

The Internet of Things towards the future, building on inherent Core Internet Values
The Internet of Things towards the future, building on inherent Core Internet Values
[please note that this workshop extends itself over two time slots - as it brings together DC IoT (09:30 - 11:00) and DC CIV (11:30 - 13:00)]

Whereas the Internet of Things has been developing over the years with focus on innovation and enabling new services, it has become clear that the further way forward will not be sustainable unless we build it on a number of Core Internet Values. The 2019 DC sessions on Internet of Things and Core Internet Values are therefore held back to back as a session of 180 minutes, with the first half of the session further divided into two sessions of 45 minutes each, introducing the aspects of relevance from DC-IoT and DC CIV perspective, followed by a joint session of 90 minutes to explore and address broader concerns towards a sustainable future for the Internet, including IoT devices and services, identifying needed security measures and Core Internet Values.


While IoT development and deployment continues to expand and grow, it is also welcome that there are more and more actors in the world seeking ways forward that will allow it to do so in a responsible manner. With IoT becoming all pervasive, and increasingly a key part of our critical infrastructures, taking ethical considerations into account from the outset has become key. A precondition for responsible IoT is that it is "secure enough" to be used responsibly. The DC IoT is currently exploring what "ethical considerations" have to be taken into account, and what can be done to come to a base-level approach for further secure roll-out and use of IoT devices, that can be trusted to be used for their purpose, and not to harm their users, or the security and stability of the Internet, itself.

Provisional agenda for the workshop
1 - Opening by Maarten Botterman, Chairman of the DC Internet of Things (DC IoT) and Olivier Crepin-Leblond, Chairman of the DC Core It Values (DC CIV): welcoming participants and explaining the rationale behind the work of the DC IoT, DC CIV, and the intent of the joint workshop;

2 - Moderated discussion with a limited number of "committed contributors",
Part I 9:30-11:00 - IoT Security focus - Avri Doria moderating,
committed contributors include Frederic Donck (Information Society); Merike Kaeo (ICANN Board/SSAC); Marco Hogewoning (RIPE NCC), Max Senges (Google) and others

a. What prerequisites are important from a security perspective, to ensure that IoT can be trusted not to be harmful to its users, nor the wider Internet; for example by, being weaponised as a tool for DDOS attacks or being used as attack vector on the users, themselves?
b. Actions that support a secure Internet (of Things), globally, across silos and geographies - what needs to be done (security by design for the world)
c. Open Discussion on IoT Security by Design
d. Preparing for Part II - Does IoT Security by Design break Core Internet Values? What ethical considerations are important in the deployment and use of IoT?
--- BREAK ---

Part II 11:30-13:00 - Core Internet Value focus - Olivier Crepin Leblond moderating

a. Reviewing Part I on IoT (short summary and conclusions of Part 1) - Maarten Botterman
b. Reminder of Core Internet Values (Sivasubramanian Muthusamy - remotely)
c. What ethical considerations are important for development, deployment and use of IoT, in order to ensure that we are creating sustainable solutions with IoT? Aspects to be considered range from affordability and deployability where needed, to transparency of choice; clarity on data sharing and protection of privacy.
d. A summarised 6F Framework proposal - Alejandro Pisanty

3. Looking ahead – which issues will become relevant in the future for IoT development, affecting the broader Internet. This provides an open microphone for new issues to address in the context of future use of IoT and recognition of Core Internet Values. Open discussion.

4- Draft conclusions by rapporteur and chairs, and closure.

Session Organizers
avatar for Maarten Botterman

Maarten Botterman

Board Director, ICANN
As an active participant of the global Internet community my main interests are in internet governance issues, and emerging issues such as the need to continuously improve the working and thus justified trust in the Internet, including Internet of Things, big data, privacy & data... Read More →


Friday November 29, 2019 09:30 - 11:00
Raum IV Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

09:30

WS 112 Assessing the Role of Algorithms in Electoral Processes
Session Organizers
avatar for Nathalia Sautchuk Patricio

Nathalia Sautchuk Patricio

Technical Advisor, NIC.br
I'm a computer engineer. I am a Technical Advisor to CGI.br and professor in some universities. My interests are: network neutrality, Education and ICT, Social and Digital Inclusion.
avatar for Vinicius W. O. Santos

Vinicius W. O. Santos

Expert advisor, NIC.br / CGI.br
Expert advisor to the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee (CGI.br)


Friday November 29, 2019 09:30 - 11:00
Raum I Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany

09:30

11:10

Data Governance Concluding Session

The Concluding Session will be an opportunity for participants to reconvene and provide insights on the Data Governance theme, following a full week of vibrant IGF discussions on various aspects of the topic.

As with the Day 1 Introductory Session, there will be discussion both in plenary and in break-out sessions looking at the different sub-themes. For each of the six sub-themes (as shown in this graphic - https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/filedepot_download/8432/1674), we hope to come away with a menu or road map of suggestions raised by the community during the week for how to address the various policy questions identified. In particular, it provides an opportunity for organisers or rapporteurs to share insights from the various sessions that have taken place throughout the week. This could include both areas of consensus and any solutions, initiatives or best practices raised, as well as any policy issues, questions that require further research, discussion or action.

AGENDA

11:10 – 11:15 Welcome and Introductions

11:15 – 11:55 Sub-thematic breakout sessions

11:55 – 12:55 Reports back from breakout sessions and plenary discussion

11:15 – 11:20 Conclusion

BACKGROUND

The Data Governance track will provide for discussions on the fundamental challenge of ensuring the benefits of the data revolution to contribute to inclusive economic development while protecting the rights of people. 

The global nature of the Internet and the transfer of digital information across borders brings an international dimension to discussions around data. The generation, collection, storage, transfer and processing of data (including personally identifiable data) have enabled new social, cultural, and economic opportunities than ever previously imagined. At the same time, the massive collection, transfer  and processing of data (in particular through the application of algorithms/AI/machine learning) by public as well as private entities pose challenges around privacy, freedom of expression and the exercise of other human rights.

The Data Governance track will contribute to identifying best approaches to ensure the development of human-centric data governance frameworks at national, regional and international levels. It will enable an exchange of views on how to support and operationalize the exercise of human rights and the empowerment of individuals in their digital identity in current uses and development of data-driven technologies. And it will consider how to create the conditions needed to facilitate data-driven innovation, to ensure competition, and to foster trust in the development of services and new technologies, including through the use of inclusive data and the fulfillment of the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.


Session Organizers
avatar for Ben Wallis

Ben Wallis

Regulatory Policy Analyst, Microsoft



Friday November 29, 2019 11:10 - 13:00
Raum I Sonnenallee 225, 12057 Berlin, Germany